Transitional (Temporary) Restorations

image_large

Missing Lateral Incisor

image_large(1)

After temporary denture (flipper)

image_large(2)

Flipper

image_large(3)

Broken down central incisors

image_large(4)

Temporary crowns

image_large(5)

Final crowns

image_large(6)

Oversized, dark colored bridgework

image_large(7)

Temporary bridges

image_large(8)

Final bridges

image_large(9)

Before

image_large(10)

Temporary crowns and veneers

image_large(11)

Final porcelain restorations

image_large(12)

Before veneers

image_large(13)

Temporary veneers

image_large(14)

After veneers

image_large(15)Before treatment

image_large(16)Temporary upper splinted (Connected) crowns

image_large(17)Smile/upper temporaries immediately post op

Whether a restoration of teeth or the entire mouth is planned what the patient will have to function with during treatment must be considered just as seriously as the end result. Very often the temporary restorations help serve as diagnostic tools to see what changes might be acceptable to the patient cosmetically or functionally speaking. If a significant change in teeth shape, position or color is going to occur it’s to everyone’s advantage to have a good idea of where you’re going before you get there. Patients often ask “What am I going to look like while I’m going through this?” It’s one thing to have beautiful wax-ups on a model but often quite another to have those same crowns, bridges or veneers in the mouth. If adjustments are necessary they can be made in the temporary restorations before the final ones are fabricated in the laboratory. Temporary restorations can take many forms but they all should look good and function well enough for the patient to eat and speak as they normally would. Also while some temporaries may only need to be in function for a few weeks or less others may have to function for several months or even years in rarer cases. I’ll show you a few of the more common types of temporary restorations and the final restorations as well.